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Thread: Who is the god of the seven rays?

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    Member saura's Avatar
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    Who is the god of the seven rays?

    "But if I should touch upon that unspeakable mystic science which the Chaldaean hath uttered through inspiration, concerning the "god of the seven rays" making souls ascend through him, I shall be speaking of things unknown; yea, altogether unknown to the vulgar, yet familiar unto the blessed ministers of the gods, wherefore I shall now pass it over in silence."

    - Emperor Julian, Oration upon the Mother of the Gods.

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    Silver Member monsno_leedra's Avatar
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    Re: Who is the god of the seven rays?

    I've always understood the reference to be to Mithras (seven rays and seven stars) as related to Zoroastrism which was one of the influence upon the Chaldean Oracles.
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    Member saura's Avatar
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    Re: Who is the god of the seven rays?

    I believe Julian was alluding to Jupiter here rather than Mithras. Mithras is not the god of just seven rays instead he is the god of many rays.

    "Bṛhaspati, when first he had his being from mighty splendour in supremest heaven, Strong, with his seven fold mouth, with noise of thunder, with his seven rays, blew and dispersed the darkness."

    - Rig Veda, Book 4, HYMN L. Bṛhaspati, Verse 4

    Brhaspati of the Vedas is the Jupiter of the Romans or the Zeus of the Greeks.

    - - - Updated - - -

    More evidence for my view.

    "In ancient Greek mythology, Zeus takes the bull-form known as Taurus in order to win Europa. The face of Taurus "gleams with seven rays of fire."
    Last edited by saura; 11 Mar 2017 at 10:54.

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    Silver Member monsno_leedra's Avatar
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    Re: Who is the god of the seven rays?

    I think the inclusion of "The Chaldean" suggests Julian is referring to the influence of the Oracles and Zoraster & Mithras and the influence it has upon Rome at the time. Figure in many ways he stands at a juncture in time when the Empire is at a point where Christianity and Mithraism are the prevailing religious influences and philosophies of the time. The seven rays and ideas associated with it match Mithraism though there are similarities to older influences. But those similarities don't specifically suggest he is referring to the elder gods or the symbologies associated with them.

    Yet Christianity will incorporate many of the Mithric traits and symbology into it's own dynamics and structure.

    But as I said just my opinion but I think his reference to "The Chaldean" is both a direct reference to the Oracles but also the the Roman who writes many of them and is referred to as The Chaldean. Sorry his name is eluding me at the moment. But he is a Senior and his son will carry many of the same credentials and also be called the Chaldean though called the Junior.
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    Member saura's Avatar
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    Re: Who is the god of the seven rays?

    I have to agree because in all of the tauroctony iconography in Mithraism, Sol Invictus/Helios is always depicted as wearing a crown of seven rays. May be both Helios-Mithras and Jupiter emit seven rays.

    "On this account, it appears to me that Plato delivers a twofold generation of the Sun; one indeed, in conjunction with the seven governors of the world, when he fashions the bodies of them, and inserts them in circulations; but the other according to the enkindling of light, through which he imparts to the Sun supermundane power. For it is one thing to generate the bulk of the Sun itself by itself, and another in conjunction with a ruling characteristic, through which the Sun is called the king of every visible nature, and is established analogous to the one fountain of good. For as this fountain, being better than the intelligible essence, illuminates both intellect and the intelligible, thus also the sun being better than a visible nature, illuminate both that which is visible and sight. But if the Sun is beyond a visible essence, it will have a supermundane nature. For the world is visible and tangible, and has a body. Hence, we must survey the Sun in a twofold respect; viz. as one of the seven planets, and as the leader of wholes; and as mundane and supermundane, according to the latter of which he splendidly emits a divine light. For in the same manner as The Good luminously emits truth which deifies the intelligible and intellectual order; as Phanes in Orpheus sends forth intelligible light which fills with intelligence all the intellectual Gods; and as Jupiter enkindles an intellectual and demiurgic light in all the supermundane Gods; thus also the Sun illuminates every thing visible through this undefiled light. The illuminating cause too is always in an order superior to the illuminated natures. For neither is The Good intelligible, nor Phanes intellectual, nor Jupiter supermundane. In consequence of this reasoning therefore, the Sun being supermundane emits the fountains of light. And according to the most mystic doctrines, the wholeness of the Sun is in the supermundane orders; for in them there is a solar world, and a total light, as the Chaldean Oracles assert, and which I am persuaded is true. And thus much concerning these things."

    - Proclus on the Timaeus of Plato

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