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Thread: Celtic Resources---Books and other Media list

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    sea witch thalassa's Avatar
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    Celtic Resources---Books and other Media list

    A place to park info on reading lists and books, articles, etc.
    “You have never answered but you did not need to. If I stand at the ocean I can hear you with your thousand voices. Sometimes you shout, hilarious laughter that taunts all questions. Other nights you are silent as death, a mirror in which the stars show themselves. Then I think you want to tell me something, but you never do. Of course I know I have written letters to no-one. But what if I find a trident tomorrow?" ~~Letters to Poseidon, Cees Nooteboom

    “We still carry this primal relationship to the Earth within our consciousness, even if we have long forgotten it. It is a primal recognition of the wonder, beauty, and divine nature of the Earth. It is a felt reverence for all that exists. Once we bring this foundational quality into our consciousness, we will be able to respond to our present man-made crisis from a place of balance, in which our actions will be grounded in an attitude of respect for all of life. This is the nature of real sustainability.”
    ~~Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

    "We are the offspring of history, and must establish our own paths in this most diverse and interesting of conceivable universes--one indifferent to our suffering, and therefore offering us maximal freedom to thrive, or to fail, in our own chosen way."
    ~~Stephen Jay Gould, Wonderful Life: The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History

    "Humans are not rational creatures. Now, logic and rationality are very helpful tools, but there’s also a place for embracing our subjectivity and thinking symbolically. Sometimes what our so-called higher thinking can’t or won’t see, our older, more primitive intuition will." John Beckett

    Pagan Devotionals, because the wind and the rain is our Bible

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    Newbie MoonLitMagicElements's Avatar
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    Re: Celtic Resources---Books and other Media list

    Well I will add one!
    By Oak, Ash, and Thorn
    Written by DJ Conway

    This is a book on modern celtic shamanism. It is a very good book on applying Shamanic practices to celtic beliefs. I especially loved the guided meditations that are all through the book, I had some profound experiences. This gives some history on the Celtic religion as well as gives guidance for your beginning journey.

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    306 Maria de Luna's Avatar
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    Re: Celtic Resources---Books and other Media list

    Quote Originally Posted by MoonLitMagicElements View Post
    Well I will add one!
    By Oak, Ash, and Thorn
    Written by DJ Conway

    This is a book on modern celtic shamanism. It is a very good book on applying Shamanic practices to celtic beliefs. I especially loved the guided meditations that are all through the book, I had some profound experiences. This gives some history on the Celtic religion as well as gives guidance for your beginning journey.
    DJ Conway is nice to read and easy to understand, but her sources tend to be iffy. She writes wonderful meditations, but her information is greatly Wiccan in origin rather than Celtic. Like I said not a bad writer, but she is not where I would go for information on gods, goddesses or mythology.
    http://catcrowsnow.blogspot.com/

    But they were doughnuts of darkness. Evil damned doughnuts, tainted by the spawn of darkness.... Which could obviously only be redeemed by passing through the fiery inferno of my digestive tract.
    ~Jim Butcher

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    sea witch thalassa's Avatar
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    Re: Celtic Resources---Books and other Media list

    From the recommended reading list of a now defunct site...

    (there may be some overlap, because their site was organized by subtopics)

    Blamires, Steve. The Irish Celtic Magical Tradition. London and San Francisco: The Aquarian Press, 1992 ISBN 1-85538 -149-4 .
    This is the book that first got me interested in Irish myths and religious systems. The meditations in the book are excellent and Blamires picks apart the Irish myths piece by piece. (DT)
    ___________, Glamoury. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995 ISBN 1-56718-069-8.
    This book deals with Irish ritual structure and tools as well as giving a brief overview of Irish gods and goddesses. (DT)
    Laurie, Erynn Rowan. A Circle of Stones: Journeys and Meditations for Modern Celts. Chicago, IL: Eschaton Books, 1996 ISBN 1-57353-106-5.
    A great collection of short Celtic daily meditations. (DT)
    Gantz, Jeffrey. Early Irish Myths and Sagas. London: Penguin Books, 1981 ISBN 0-14-044397-5.
    This is a wonderful easy to read translation of Irish myths and legends. One of the first I used in learning about the mythology of the Irish Celts, it is still a favorite. (DT)
    Freeman, Mara. Kindling the Celtic Spirit: Ancient Traditions to Illumine Your Life Throughout the Seasons. New York: HarperSanFrancisco, 2001. Hardback ISBN: 0-06-251685-X; paperback ISBN: 0-06-251686-8.
    The books is divided into twelve themed chapters, one for each month. Each chapter contains stories and myths relating to the theme, practical crafts and exercises that help readers immerse themselves in the them, sections on holy places, animals, trees, recipes and a meditation.
    I have positive feelings and mixed thoughts about this book. I have found the exercises and meditations very inspiring and very helpful in developing a spiritual understanding of seasonal changes. I do not think that this is a book that will teach the reader much about “ancient” Celtic spiritual practices.
    Ms. Freeman seems to have a different definition of “ancient” that I use. For me, the word refers to that which is prior to the fall of the Roman Empire. It seems that very few of the folkways and customs can be documented to date that early. Based on my studies in Celtic cultures so far, I doubt that what is presented here as “ancient” Celtic bears much resemblance to the spiritual practices of the ancient Celts. Kindling the Celtic Spirit seems an amalgamation of what is believed to be remnants of ancient spirituality hidden in relatively recent folk practices and Western Mystery Traditions.
    I do have some quibbles with her use of the generic term “Celtic” when she is speaking only of Insular Celts. While she states that her book is only about Insular Celts in her introduction, it would have been less misleading if she had used “insular” before mentions of “Celtic” unless she really was speaking for all of the Celtic peoples. For example, on page 12, she implies that all Iron Age Celts lived in and used circular structures, when such structures are found mostly in British Island and Ireland while continental Iron Age Celts tended to have rectangular structures.
    In spite of the historical weaknesses of the book, I do feel that the inspirational value makes it a worthwhile addition to the bookshelf. The reader should use the information given here as a stepping stone to further research in these subjects and the solid, if brief, bibliography provides an excellent starting place. (SR)
    Harbison, Peter. Pre Christian Ireland From the 1st Settlers to the Early Celts. New York, New York: Thames and Hudson, 1988 ISBN 0-500-02110-4.
    This is one of the first full scale surveys of early Irish pre-history fit for general public consumption. This is not a book for beginners, but can be used as a reference to archaeological finds in Ireland. Even though it’s 10 years old, it still has a lot of vital information on major sites in Ireland. (DT)
    Kinsella, Thomas. The Tain. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press, 1969 ISBN 0-19-281090-1.


    from a now defunct site's reading list, still available @ http://web.archive.org/web/200608220.../ssbbibir.html
    Delaney, Frank (writer and narrator). The Celts: Rich Tradition and Ancient Myths. BBC Video, 1986.
    This is the collection of a 6-show series that was aired on the BBC in 1986. It begins in Hallstatt, Austria, at the Celtic salt-miner settlement of 2500 years ago and leads us through the archaeological finds that show the spread of the Celtic empire from Ireland to Hungary, through the rise and fall of the Roman Empire and the void left behind in the Celtic lands when the Roman army withdrew. The first show alone is worth seeing for a view of the Hallstatt and Hochdorf, Germany remains, and the autopsy of Lindow Man. Even the most well-read Celtophile will be further enlightened by actually seeing with their own eyes these finds and places previously only imagined from description. The third show on Celtic spirituality is especially interesting and well-presented, giving a relatively balanced view of Druids and insight into the Celtic mythology and religious practices as they evolved from Paganism to Christianity.
    Interviews with some of the leading Celtic scholars of today, such as Anne Ross, Pronsias Mac Cana, and Barry Cunliffe are interspersed throughout the video, and the haunting music of Enya is an appropriate backdrop. A highly recommended overview, presented with humor and sensitivity. (DT 2002)
    Ellis, Peter Beresford. Celtic Women: Women in Celtic Society and Literature. London: Constable and Company Ltd, 1995.
    Read this in tandem with with Jean Markale’s Women of the Celts (below). While he does not footnote his sources, Ellis has written a fairly scholarly, but accessible, book on women in Celtic society using archaeological, anthropological, literary and folklore sources. (SR)
    Green, Miranda. The Celtic World. London: Routledge, 1995.
    A more up-to-date compendium of archaeological and anthropological materials on the Celts. (SR)
    _______. The Druid World. New York: Thames and Hudson LTD, 1997.
    A compendium of archaeological and anthropological materials on the Druids. Green frequently cautions her readers about the limitations of the sources we have, but very occasionally writes as if speculation based on these limited sources are established facts. (SR)
    _______. Dictionary of Celtic Myth and Legend. New York: Thames and Hudson LTD, 1997.
    An A–Z of known Celtic deities and Celtic symbols. (SR)
    Harbison, Peter. Pre Christian Ireland From the 1st Settlers to the Early Celts. New York, New York: Thames and Hudson, 1988 ISBN 0-500-02110-4.
    This is one of the first full scale surveys of early Irish prehistory fit for general public consumption. This is not a book for beginners, but can be used as a reference to archaeological finds in Ireland. Even though it’s 10 years old, it still has a lot of vital information on major sites in Ireland. (DT)
    James, Simon. The World of the Celts. New York, New York: Thames and Hudson, 1993.
    This is one of the first overviews of the Celts that I ever bought and it still remains a favorite. The text is well written and well researched but the illustrations are better! If you want an inexpensive but well written book on the Celts, this is a good place to start. (DT)
    Markale, Jean. Women of the Celts. Rochester. VT: Inner Traditions, 1972, 1975 (trans).
    Markale’s work as an historian is often criticized, but his ideas are interesting from an esoteric view point and are worth the effort exploring. This English translation is far more easy to read than than the translations of some of his other books. This particular book focuses on Arthurian women especially and the roles of women in Celtic societies. (SR)
    ________. The Celts: Uncovering the Mythic and Historic Origins of Western Culture. Rochester. VT: Inner Traditions, 1976, 1978 (trans).
    This should be read with a pinch (or two or three) of salt as history, but again, very thought-provoking ideas from the magical/esoteric point of view. (SR)
    Rees, Alwyn and Brinley Rees. Celtic Heritage: Ancient Tradition in Ireland and Wales. London: Thames and Hudson, 1961.
    Although somewhat dated, this is still a often-cited and well-respected text on Celtic culture and its origins. The authors attempt to understand Celtic mentalities through the Celts’ Indo-European roots. (SR)
    Wells, Peter S. The Barbarians Speak: How the Conquered Peoples Shaped Roman Europe. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1999; reprint, 2001.
    Wells compares the archaeological evidence with contemporary written Roman accounts to show a more complete and more complex picture of how conquered people in the area Wells describes as "temperate Europe," adapted to the influences of their conquerors and also how they changed the culture and society of their conquerors. Wells also looks at how Roman provincial society changed and was changed by the peoples who lived beyond the frontiers of the Empire.
    Comparisons of archaeological findings with written contemporary records reveal that acculturation of the newly dominant culture was a complex process. In some places, indigenous populations resisted Romanization for decades; in others, Roman customs and material culture were readily adapted; while in yet other places the population blended native and Roman to varying degrees. Often status played a roll as well: elite members of the native society often adopted Roman practices while lower-status individuals might cling to their native traditions. Wells also looks at more modern and better documented situations of conquest and colonization as possible models of interpreting the archaeological and historical evidence.

    The writing style is sometimes quite dry and repetitive (Wells never lets us forget the limitations of the evidence at hand or the complexities of cultural changes). I would have like to have seen proper footnotes or end notes, but the bibliographic essay does lead the reader to more detailed sources. I would also have found it useful to have more illustrations comparing the various styles of pottery, jewelry and other artifacts he discusses in the text.
    The Barbarians Speak does allow us to begin to see the Roman conquest from the perspective of the natives rather than that of the Romans. I would recommend this to any one who has a serious interest in the study of the Celts and Germans in the time of the Roman conquest of northern and western Europe. (SR)

    O’Driscoll, Robert (ed.). The Celtic Consciousness. New York: George Braziller, Inc., 1981 ISBN 0-8076-1136-0.
    This collection of 55 essays by leading authorities on the Celtic world gives a great overview of Celtic art, folklore, music, archaeology and myths. (DT).
    Markale, Jean. Women of the Celts. Rochester. VT: Inner Traditions, 1972, 1975 (trans).
    Markale’s work as an historian is often criticized, but his ideas are interesting from an esoteric view point and are worth the effort exploring. This English translation is far easier to read than the translations of some of his other books. This particular book focuses on Arthurian women especially and the roles of women in Celtic societies. (SR)
    Rees, Alwyn and Brinley Rees. Celtic Heritage: Ancient Tradition in Ireland and Wales. London: Thames and Hudson, 1961.
    Although dated, this is still a often-cited text on Celtic culture and its origins. The authors attempt to understand Celtic mentalities through the Celts Indo-European roots. (SR)

    Bromwich, Rachel. Trioedd Ynys Prydein. Cardiff: University of Wales, 1961.
    This is one of the most useful books on Welsh literary tradition, folklore, and mythology and a sad reminder of what has been lost over time. The Triads were lists of three connected items (such as characters who all did a certain acts or had a certain characteristic) and, in this case, believed to have been mnemonic devices for bards and storytellers. An example is “The Three Futile Battles of the Island of Britain.”
    One of them was the Battle of Goddeu: It was brought about by the cause of the bitch, together with the roebuck and the plover; The second was the Action of Arfderydd, which was brought about by the cause of the lark’s nest;And the third was the worst: that was Camlan, which was brought about because of a quarrel between Gwenhwyfar and Gwenhwyfach. That is why those were called futile: because they were brought about by such a barren cause as that.
    The first part of the book is a lengthy discussion of the Medieval manuscripts on which they were written, the forms of the language used and the probable dating of the manuscripts. The second part has each triad in its original Welsh followed by an English translation with notes. There are also several appendices to this section containing related Welsh literature. The third part is a dictionary of personal names found in the triads and what was known about them at the time of writing. Invaluable to students of Welsh mythology or Arthurian legends. (SR)
    Ford, Patrick (ed. and trans.). The Mabinogi, and Other Medieval Welsh Tales. N.P.: University of California Press, 1983.
    A well-respected compilation of Welsh medieval literature translated into English. It includes the the Four Branches of the Mabinogi, “Culhwch and Olwen,” “Dream of Rhonabwy,” “Lludd and Llevelys” and some of the Gwion Bach/Taliesin literature, along with excellent commentaries. This was the first translation of the Mabinogi I read, and its still one of my favorites. (SR)
    Gantz, Jeffrey (trans.) The Mabinogion. NP: Viking Penguin, 1977.
    Another well-respected compilation of Welsh medieval literature translated into English. It includes the the Four Branches of the Mabinogi, “Culhwch and Olwen,” “Dream of Rhonabwy,” “Lludd and Llevelys” and the three Welsh Arthurian Romances (but not the Gwion Bach/Taliesin materials). Gantz's translations are somewhat more formal in tone than Patrick Ford’s. Both the Ford translations and the Gantz translation are valuable to the study of Welsh literature and legend. (SR)
    Ross, Anne. Pagan Celtic Britain: Studies in Iconography and Tradition. London: Constable and Company, LTD, 1992 reprint of 1967 edition.
    This is an encyclopedic account of what was known about Pagan Celtic Britain in 1962 and is quite useful if you ignore Dr. Ross’s opinions about the “primitiveness” of Celtic religion. Of course, more anthropological and archaeological studies have since been done since then, so the book is somewhat dated. (SR)


    Gantz, Jeffrey. Early Irish Myths and Sagas. London: Penguin Books, 1981 ISBN 0-14-044397-5.
    This is a wonderful easy to read translation of Irish myths and legends. One of the first I used in learning about the mythology of the Irish Celts, it is still a favorite. (DT)
    Kinsella, Thomas. The Tain. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press, 1969 ISBN 0-19-281090-1.
    This is a tried and true translation of the Tain bo Cuailnge. (DT)
    source: http://web.archive.org/web/200608220.../ssbbibce.html
    (to be cont)
    “You have never answered but you did not need to. If I stand at the ocean I can hear you with your thousand voices. Sometimes you shout, hilarious laughter that taunts all questions. Other nights you are silent as death, a mirror in which the stars show themselves. Then I think you want to tell me something, but you never do. Of course I know I have written letters to no-one. But what if I find a trident tomorrow?" ~~Letters to Poseidon, Cees Nooteboom

    “We still carry this primal relationship to the Earth within our consciousness, even if we have long forgotten it. It is a primal recognition of the wonder, beauty, and divine nature of the Earth. It is a felt reverence for all that exists. Once we bring this foundational quality into our consciousness, we will be able to respond to our present man-made crisis from a place of balance, in which our actions will be grounded in an attitude of respect for all of life. This is the nature of real sustainability.”
    ~~Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

    "We are the offspring of history, and must establish our own paths in this most diverse and interesting of conceivable universes--one indifferent to our suffering, and therefore offering us maximal freedom to thrive, or to fail, in our own chosen way."
    ~~Stephen Jay Gould, Wonderful Life: The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History

    "Humans are not rational creatures. Now, logic and rationality are very helpful tools, but there’s also a place for embracing our subjectivity and thinking symbolically. Sometimes what our so-called higher thinking can’t or won’t see, our older, more primitive intuition will." John Beckett

    Pagan Devotionals, because the wind and the rain is our Bible

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    Re: Celtic Resources---Books and other Media list

    (cont...I ran into the post count, lol)

    Bromwich, Rachel. Trioedd Ynys Prydein. Cardiff: University of Wales, 1961.
    This is one of the most useful books on Welsh literary tradition, folklore, and mythology and a sad reminder of what has been lost over time. The Triads were lists of three connected items (such as characters who all did a certain acts or had a certain characteristic) and, in this case, believed to have been mnemonic devices for bards and storytellers. An example is “The Three Futile Battles of the Island of Britain.”
    One of them was the Battle of Goddeu: It was brought about by the cause of the bitch, together with the roebuck and the plover;
    The second was the Action of Arfderydd, which was brought about by the cause of the lark’s nest;
    And the third was the worst: that was Camlan, which was brought about because of a quarrel between Gwenhwyfar and Gwenhwyfach.
    That is why those were called futile: because they were brought about by such a barren cause as that.
    The first part of the book is a lengthy discussion of the Medieval manuscripts on which they were written, the forms of the language used and the probable dating of the manuscripts. The second part has each triad in its original Welsh followed by an English translation with notes. There are also several appendices to this section containing related Welsh literature. The third part is a dictionary of personal names found in the triads and what was known about them at the time of writing. Invaluable to students of Welsh mythology or Arthurian legends. (SR)
    Ford, Patrick (ed. and trans.). The Mabinogi, and Other Medieval Welsh Tales. N.P.: University of California Press, 1983.
    A well-respected compilation of Welsh medieval literature tranlated into English. It includes the the Four Branches of the Mabinogi, “Culhwch and Olwen,” “Dream of Rhonabwy,” “Lludd and Llevelys” and some of the Gwion Bach/Taliesin literature, along with excellent commentaries. This was the first translation of the Mabinogi I read, and its still one of my favorites. (SR)
    Gantz, Jeffrey (trans.). The Mabinogion. N.P.: Viking Penguin, 1977.
    Another well-respected compilation of Welsh medieval literature tranlated into English. It includes the the Four Branches of the Mabinogi, “Culhwch and Olwen,” “Dream of Rhonabwy,” “Lludd and Llevelys” and the three Welsh Arthurian Romances (but not the Gwion Bach/Taliesin materials). Gantz's translations are somewhat more formal in tone than Patrick Ford’s. Both the Ford translations and the Gantz translation are valuble to the study of Welsh literature and legend. (SR)
    Knight, Gareth.The Secret Tradition in Arthurian Legend. Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, UK: The Aquarian Press, 1983.
    This approaches the Arthurian legends from an esoteric Christian/ceremonial magic/qabalistic viewpoint. I have not read this in a long time, but I remember it as being not too difficult. (SR)
    Markale, Jean. King of the Celts: Arthurian Legends and Celtic Tradition. Rochester. VT: Inner Traditions, 1976, 1977 (trans).
    This work explores the Arthurian legends in the context of Celtic literature and folklore. This translation takes work to get through. (SR)
    I have many works by John and/or Caitlìn Matthews who are my spiritual mentors. They work primarily with Irish/British Celtic and Arthurian myth systems. John Matthews seems to have his primary training in Arthurian/Grail traditions, while Caitlìn appears to come from a Irish Pagan tradition. From a historical and linguistic standpoint, their works have been criticized. However, their goal seems to be the creation of a spiritual system using British and Irish Celtic and Arthurian materials as a basis, not to create a factual story about the Celts or about literary history. They are usually emphatic about their purposes and repeatedly state their purposes in their works. (SR)
    They have written numerous books separately and together. For a more information see their web site. Some of the most useful for beginners are:
    Matthews, Caitlìn. Arthur & the Sovereignty of Britain. London: Arkana, 1989.
    ________. Celtic Devotional: Daily Prayers and Blessings. New York: Harmony Books, 1996. ISBN 0-517-70413-7.
    This is the best book of daily blessings, devotions, prayers and short meditations I have ever used. I’ve used this book on a more or less daily basis and the meditations are the most thoughtful I have ever encountered. I would recommend this book to anyone who had an interest in integrating Celtic spiritual practices in daily life. (DT)
    _________. Elements of the Celtic Tradition. Shaftsbury, UK: Element Books, 1989.
    _________. Mabon & the Mysteries of Britain: an exploration of the Mabinogion. London: Arkana, 1987.
    _________. Singing the Soul Back Home: Shamanism in Daily Life. Shaftsbury, UK: Element Books, 1995.
    One of the best books I have ever read dealing with the shamanic journeys, the upper middle and under worlds and the spirit world. The meditations are challenging and moving. (DT) Ditto. (SR)
    Matthews, John. Celtic Shamanism. Shaftsbury, UK: Element Books, 1989.
    ________. Elements of the Grail Tradition. Shaftsbury, UK: Element Books, 1990.
    ________. Elements of the Arthurian Tradition. Shaftsbury, UK: Element Books, 1989.
    ________. Gawain, Knight of the Goddess. Wellingborough, UK: Aquarian Press, 1990.
    ________. Robin Hood - Green Lord of the Wildwood. Glastonbury, Somerset, UK: Gothic Image Publications, 1993. ISBN 0-906362-24-5.
    As far as I know this book has not been published in the United States but it can be mail ordered. It is my favorite esoteric look at the Robin Hood myth from the early ballads to morris dancing and Maid Marian. This book also contains fantastic guided meditations steeped in British folklore. However, this book is not to be used as a historical look at the life of Robin Hood. (DT)
    Matthews, John and Caitlìn. The Western Way. London: Arkana, 1985.
    An introduction to Western Magical Traditions, both “Native” traditions and “Hermetic” traditions. (SR)
    R.J. Stewart also works in these areas especially with the god-form of Merlin, and some of his works are:
    Stewart. R.J. The Mystic Life of Merlin. London: Arkana, 1986.
    ________. The Prophetic Life of Merlin. London: Arkana, 1986.
    ________. The Way of Merlin. London: Aquarian Press, 1991.
    ________. Earth Light. Shaftsbury, UK: Element Books, 1992.
    Strictly speaking this book and the one cited below are not part of the Arthurian traditions. However, they have interesting and challenging methods of magical study and I have learned much from them. (SR)
    ________. Power within the Land. Shaftsbury, UK: Element Books, 1992.
    ________. The Waters of the Gap: Magic, Mythology and the Celtic Heritage. Bath, England: Ashgrove Press Limited. 1989. ISBN 1-85398-012-9.
    This book is specifically about the hot springs at Bath in England and explores the history and legends of the site. This is a great guide and source, but Stewart still insists on spreading the “triple mother goddess” and “maiden, mother and crone” myths as opposed to looking at the source information about the Celtic triple goddesses. (DT)
    Ross, Anne. Pagan Celtic Britain: Studies in Iconography and Tradition. London: Constable and Company, LTD, 1992 reprint of 1967 edition.
    This is an encyclopedic account of what was known about Pagan Celtic Britain in 1962 and is quite useful if you ignore Dr. Ross’s opinions about the “primitiveness” of Celtic religion. Of course, more anthropological and archaeological studies have since been done since then, so the book is somewhat dated. (SR)



    source: http://web.archive.org/web/200608220.../ssbbibbr.html
    “You have never answered but you did not need to. If I stand at the ocean I can hear you with your thousand voices. Sometimes you shout, hilarious laughter that taunts all questions. Other nights you are silent as death, a mirror in which the stars show themselves. Then I think you want to tell me something, but you never do. Of course I know I have written letters to no-one. But what if I find a trident tomorrow?" ~~Letters to Poseidon, Cees Nooteboom

    “We still carry this primal relationship to the Earth within our consciousness, even if we have long forgotten it. It is a primal recognition of the wonder, beauty, and divine nature of the Earth. It is a felt reverence for all that exists. Once we bring this foundational quality into our consciousness, we will be able to respond to our present man-made crisis from a place of balance, in which our actions will be grounded in an attitude of respect for all of life. This is the nature of real sustainability.”
    ~~Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

    "We are the offspring of history, and must establish our own paths in this most diverse and interesting of conceivable universes--one indifferent to our suffering, and therefore offering us maximal freedom to thrive, or to fail, in our own chosen way."
    ~~Stephen Jay Gould, Wonderful Life: The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History

    "Humans are not rational creatures. Now, logic and rationality are very helpful tools, but there’s also a place for embracing our subjectivity and thinking symbolically. Sometimes what our so-called higher thinking can’t or won’t see, our older, more primitive intuition will." John Beckett

    Pagan Devotionals, because the wind and the rain is our Bible

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    Re: Celtic Resources---Books and other Media list

    Thanks for that list! ^^^ I'm set for a while.

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    306 Maria de Luna's Avatar
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    Re: Celtic Resources---Books and other Media list

    Should have posted something after my last post, but I lost so many books and the move, and can't manage to transfer PF from iPad to computer (I keep forgetting my new passwords and have changed them like six times this month) so I'm kinda derpy at the moment!
    http://catcrowsnow.blogspot.com/

    But they were doughnuts of darkness. Evil damned doughnuts, tainted by the spawn of darkness.... Which could obviously only be redeemed by passing through the fiery inferno of my digestive tract.
    ~Jim Butcher

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    *a little bad taste is like a nice dash of paprika*

    Re: Celtic Resources---Books and other Media list

    “You have never answered but you did not need to. If I stand at the ocean I can hear you with your thousand voices. Sometimes you shout, hilarious laughter that taunts all questions. Other nights you are silent as death, a mirror in which the stars show themselves. Then I think you want to tell me something, but you never do. Of course I know I have written letters to no-one. But what if I find a trident tomorrow?" ~~Letters to Poseidon, Cees Nooteboom

    “We still carry this primal relationship to the Earth within our consciousness, even if we have long forgotten it. It is a primal recognition of the wonder, beauty, and divine nature of the Earth. It is a felt reverence for all that exists. Once we bring this foundational quality into our consciousness, we will be able to respond to our present man-made crisis from a place of balance, in which our actions will be grounded in an attitude of respect for all of life. This is the nature of real sustainability.”
    ~~Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

    "We are the offspring of history, and must establish our own paths in this most diverse and interesting of conceivable universes--one indifferent to our suffering, and therefore offering us maximal freedom to thrive, or to fail, in our own chosen way."
    ~~Stephen Jay Gould, Wonderful Life: The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History

    "Humans are not rational creatures. Now, logic and rationality are very helpful tools, but there’s also a place for embracing our subjectivity and thinking symbolically. Sometimes what our so-called higher thinking can’t or won’t see, our older, more primitive intuition will." John Beckett

    Pagan Devotionals, because the wind and the rain is our Bible

  9. #9
    sea witch thalassa's Avatar
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    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    Religion
    relational theophysis and bioregional witchery
    Location
    coastal Georgia
    Phrase
    *a little bad taste is like a nice dash of paprika*

    Re: Celtic Resources---Books and other Media list

    Books on (contemporary) Druidry and Druidism:

    Sacred Fire, Holy Well: A Druid's Grimoire by Ian Corrigan*
    The Solitary Druid: Walking the Path of Wisdom and Spirit by Rev. Robert (Skip) Ellison**
    Deep Ancestors: Practicing the Religion of the Proto-Indo-Europeans by Ceisiwr Serith**
    The Druid Magic Handbook: Ritual Magic Rooted in the Living Earth by John Michael Greer*
    The Druidry Handbook by John Michael Greer**
    The Path of Druidry: Walking the Ancient Green Way by Penny Billington
    Ritual by Emma Restall Orr***
    Pagan Portals - The Awen Alone: Walking the Path of the Solitary Druid by Joanna van der Hoeven
    Druid Mysteries: Ancient Wisdom for the 21st Century by Philip Carr-Gomm*
    A World Full of Gods: An Inquiry into Polytheism by John Michael Greer***
    Druidcraft: The Magic of Wicca and Druidry by Philip Carr-Gomm
    Druidry and Meditation by Nimue Brown (I've not read her books, but I quite enjoy her blog)
    A Druid's Herbal for the Sacred Earth Year by Ellen Evert Hopman

    *Books I've read
    **Books that I've read and incorporated aspects of into my path and/or really liked otherwise
    ***Books I effin adore and think every Pagan should read, regardless of tradition or path


    I don't recommend: Druid Magic: The Practice of Celtic Wisdom by Maya Magee Sutton (I don't remember why I thought it was really terrible, but I did)
    “You have never answered but you did not need to. If I stand at the ocean I can hear you with your thousand voices. Sometimes you shout, hilarious laughter that taunts all questions. Other nights you are silent as death, a mirror in which the stars show themselves. Then I think you want to tell me something, but you never do. Of course I know I have written letters to no-one. But what if I find a trident tomorrow?" ~~Letters to Poseidon, Cees Nooteboom

    “We still carry this primal relationship to the Earth within our consciousness, even if we have long forgotten it. It is a primal recognition of the wonder, beauty, and divine nature of the Earth. It is a felt reverence for all that exists. Once we bring this foundational quality into our consciousness, we will be able to respond to our present man-made crisis from a place of balance, in which our actions will be grounded in an attitude of respect for all of life. This is the nature of real sustainability.”
    ~~Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

    "We are the offspring of history, and must establish our own paths in this most diverse and interesting of conceivable universes--one indifferent to our suffering, and therefore offering us maximal freedom to thrive, or to fail, in our own chosen way."
    ~~Stephen Jay Gould, Wonderful Life: The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History

    "Humans are not rational creatures. Now, logic and rationality are very helpful tools, but there’s also a place for embracing our subjectivity and thinking symbolically. Sometimes what our so-called higher thinking can’t or won’t see, our older, more primitive intuition will." John Beckett

    Pagan Devotionals, because the wind and the rain is our Bible

  10. #10
    sea witch thalassa's Avatar
    Reputation
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    11,228
    Religion
    relational theophysis and bioregional witchery
    Location
    coastal Georgia
    Phrase
    *a little bad taste is like a nice dash of paprika*

    Re: Celtic Resources---Books and other Media list

    “You have never answered but you did not need to. If I stand at the ocean I can hear you with your thousand voices. Sometimes you shout, hilarious laughter that taunts all questions. Other nights you are silent as death, a mirror in which the stars show themselves. Then I think you want to tell me something, but you never do. Of course I know I have written letters to no-one. But what if I find a trident tomorrow?" ~~Letters to Poseidon, Cees Nooteboom

    “We still carry this primal relationship to the Earth within our consciousness, even if we have long forgotten it. It is a primal recognition of the wonder, beauty, and divine nature of the Earth. It is a felt reverence for all that exists. Once we bring this foundational quality into our consciousness, we will be able to respond to our present man-made crisis from a place of balance, in which our actions will be grounded in an attitude of respect for all of life. This is the nature of real sustainability.”
    ~~Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

    "We are the offspring of history, and must establish our own paths in this most diverse and interesting of conceivable universes--one indifferent to our suffering, and therefore offering us maximal freedom to thrive, or to fail, in our own chosen way."
    ~~Stephen Jay Gould, Wonderful Life: The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History

    "Humans are not rational creatures. Now, logic and rationality are very helpful tools, but there’s also a place for embracing our subjectivity and thinking symbolically. Sometimes what our so-called higher thinking can’t or won’t see, our older, more primitive intuition will." John Beckett

    Pagan Devotionals, because the wind and the rain is our Bible

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